Contaminated Soil Excavation & AQMD Rule 1166


Contaminated Soil Excavation & AQMD Rule 1166

AQMD Rule 1166 applies to Southern California construction sites undergoing contaminated soil excavation. To start, AQMD Rule 1166 requires a mitigation plan.  Moreover, this report is also goes by the title “Contaminated Soil Excavation Plan.” Additionally, the rule requires air quality testing during excavation. The primary oversight agency is the Air Quality Management District (also referred to as the AQMD or SCAQMD in the South Coast). Updated February 19, 2019.

Contaminated Soil Excavation and AQMD Rule 1166 ©Dmitry_Kalinovsky

Contaminated Soil Excavation and AQMD Rule 1166 ©Dmitry_Kalinovsky

Discovering Contaminated Soil Excavation Issues

Unless a Phase 1 Environmental Site Assessment or Phase 2 Subsurface Investigation calls it out, you may be surprised to find contaminated soil at a job site. It happens from time to time. As a result, there are legal requirements for disposal and monitoring. Consequently, an environmental engineering firm should be retained to achieve proper contaminated soil excavation and AQMD Rule 1166 compliance.

In the first place, the process starts with soil sampling by an environmental consultant. Next, the consultant will prepare a waste profile and manifest. At this point, the engineering firm should also complete a mitigation plan. Some mitigation plans are site-specific. Others are for various locations. Lastly, the SCAQMD will need to approve the mitigation plan, and issue a permit to dig.

Tasks that require AQMD Rule 1166 Compliance

Per the rule, compliance is necessary for each of the following activities:

  • Removal of any underground storage tank (UST) or associated product piping.
  • Contaminated soil excavation.
  • Stockpiling and movement of contaminated soil.
  • The treatment of contaminated soil at a disposal facility.

Accordingly, there is a need to monitor disturbed soil via an organic vapor analyzer (OVA). Often times a photo-ionization detector (PID) is exemplary. Other times a flame-ionization detector (FID) may be more ideal.

Costs for Contaminated Soil Excavation

Unfortunately, we are unable to provide any general cost estimates via the internet. There are just too many variables in each project. A custom price quote is a requirement for each specific project.  However, you can expect to pay for the following items for an AQMD Rule 1166 compliant contaminated soil excavation:

  • Soil sample laboratory analysis.
  • AQMD Rule 1166 permit application.
  • Mitigation Plan preparation.
  • Contaminated soil excavation air monitoring labor.
  • Permit closure process.
Finish the Job Right and Save Money

AQMD Rule 1166 compliance is a requirement for contaminated soil excavation. Although this process is costly, the fines and penalties for violating them are more. Thus, its best to consult an proper environmental engineering firm. Moreover, a Phase 1 Environmental Site Assessment at the purchase stage is the best recommendation for staying one step ahead. If contaminated soil becomes apparent during the assessment, a proper budget can be set.

 

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